Living with a Cold Sore

Sorefix advice on treating cold sores

The herpes simplex virus that causes cold sores cannot be cured. After you get infected, the virus stays in your body for the rest of your life. If you get fever blisters often, cold sore treatments can prevent or reduce the number of cold sores you get and how severe they are.

The faster you treat a cold sore, the better. You have to treat a cold sore before you actually see or feel something, so it is important to recognize what triggers the sore to activate in your body. See what might set off your next cold sore and avoid it at all costs.

If the triggers are unknown to you, start the treatment of the cold sore if you feel the tingling. Treatment may include lip balm, cold sore creams, ointments, cold sore lotions or sometimes pills. With these methods of treatment you may be able to shorten the length of time you have a cold sore. During all the stages of a cold sore it is still useful to treat it.

Do's
Don'ts
Sleep and relaxation
Kiss your loved ones
Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water
Touching and rubbing on the cold sore
Protecting babies and young kids
Eating salty or acidic foods
Apply the product only to the affected area or blisters
Cups and eating utensils should not be shared with another person
Practise safe sex
Take care when applying or removing make up

Prevent cold sores

Prevention is better than cure!

Follow this simple Sorefix advice to prevent cold sores. Firstly, it is essential to avoid common cold sore triggers. Almost everybody who has a cold sore has learned from experience that the nasty little blisters tend to come when your resistance is low. Common cold sore causes include stress, fatigue, exposure to intense sunlight (UV), monthly period, chapped or dry lips, or an illness such as flu or a cold. There are some things you can do to prevent or reduce your number of outbreaks.

Do's
Don'ts
Have enough sleep
Kissing a person with a cold sore
Avoid your triggers
Intense sunlight (UV)
Recognize the signs of an outbreak
Biting your lips
Eat healthy food
Avoid sharing towels, razors, cutlery, toothbrushes, or other objects that a person with a cold sore may have used
Keep your lips moisturised with lip balm
Take vitamin supplements if you suspect you don’t get enough from your diet.

Compare treatments

SoreFix has a unique action;

it works differently than the other treatments.

SoreFix not only treats at tingle or cold sore blister, but also prevents cold sore outbreaks.

SoreFix is effective in all cold sore stages:

SoreFix
Conventional drugs
Blister patches
Zinc sulphate cream
Effective in all stages
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Treats cold sore symptoms
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Prevents cold sore
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Recommended use at tingle
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Recommended use at blister
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Sun protection filter
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Total applications
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Expiry date
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Moisturises
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Baby and cold sore

Anyone can transfer the herpes simplex virus to a baby. It could be by a kiss, sharing a cup, utensil, or slobbery toy with someone who has the herpes simplex virus. A baby can also get the herpes virus during a vaginal birth if his mother has genital herpes.

Most people get the herpes simplex virus sometime during childhood. During the first outbreak, the following symptoms may occur for the baby:

• Blisters on lips or around the mouth
• Pain in the mouth
• Fever
• Poor drinking
• Drowsiness
• Swollen lymph nodes
• Sore throat
• Gum inflammation

A cold sore could be dangerous for a baby. If your baby is less than 3 months old and he gets any kind of mouth sore, call the doctor right away. Especially with newborn babies, the herpes virus can spread to other parts of the body, causing serious potentially permanent damage. In newborn babies cold sores can be life threatening, although this is rare. Try to keep your baby away from touching the cold sore. In fact, to keep him from spreading the infection, wash his hands regularly and try to keep him from picking at the cold sore. You may want to put little mittens or socks on his hands while he sleeps. If you have a cold sore, you should avoid kissing your baby (especially if he’s newborn) until the cold sore goes away. Remember, one peck with an infected lip is all it takes to pass on the herpes simplex virus. You’ll also want to avoid sharing cups and eating utensils while you have a cold sore. If your child seems prone to cold sores as he gets older, you may want to protect him from the sun, since exposure to sunlight can trigger an outbreak once a child has the virus. Putting a brimmed hat and some lip balm on him for protection should help.